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Top 25 Players in the Big Ten for 2017: No’s. 25-21

It is once again that time of year, as we unveil our annual rankings of the Top 25 players in Big Ten Football. For the 3rd year in a row no less.

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It is almost time for pads to start popping and helmets to start cracking together…and that means football season is right around the corner. Here at talking10 it also means the release of our annual Big Ten Preseason Top 25 Players list.

The list is compiled by our staff and is a projection of who we think are the best players in the Big Ten.

Let’s just say 2017 will be an interesting year if our polling is any indication. It was an intense battle amongst some 41 total players to receive votes. Only 25 could make the cut, but before we get there we need to kick it off with a look at the five names that just missed out on the Top 25 list.

Here are our Honorable Mention picks for the 2017 season:

  • Jerome Baker, LB (Ohio State)
  • Billy Price, OL (Ohio State)
  • T.J. Edwards, LB (Wisconsin)
  • Simmie Cobbs, WR (Indiana)
  • Sam Hubbard, DE (Ohio State)

That is just how competitive it was to get in to our Top 25 of the poll. So, without further ado, let’s get on with the list. Up first is our group that begins the poll with No’s 25 through 21 and enjoy the eclectic mix of players in our first five spots on the poll.

No. 25 — Tyquan Lewis, DE (Ohio State)

2016 Season Stats: 29 tackles, 10.5 tackles for loss, 8.0 sacks, 3 forced fumbles
Best Game: vs. Indiana (5 tackles, 2.0 tfl’s, 1 sack)

The reigning Big Ten Defensive Lineman of the Year barely made it on to our countdown. Crazy, huh? But as any coach will tell you, this isn’t so much about last year and a lot more about this year. Lewis is likely to be very productive again this season, but Ohio State is so deep at defensive end, it may be that the snaps won’t be there for him to be as productive on paper.

Lewis is one of the most disruptive edge presences in run defense in the Big Ten. He hasn’t been asked to be a great pass rushing threat to date in his career. Will the Buckeyes unleash him in new defensive coordinator Greg Schiano’s scheme? If so, this ranking is likely to change by the end of the season.

No. 24 — Nick Westbrook, WR (Indiana)

2016 Season Stats: 54 receptions, 995 yards, 6 touchdowns
Best Game: vs Wake Forest (6 receptions, 129 yards, 2 touchdowns)

Who is the leading returning receiver in the Big Ten? We’re guessing you didn’t come up with Nick Westbrook right off the top of your head, but he is indeed the No. 1 returning receiver in terms of receptions and yards. He’s also second in returning players with six touchdowns on the year.

All of that is impressive, but imagine what would’ve happened with some consistency from the quarterback position. Westbrook’s ability to be a deep target was taken full advantage of last season, while he also showcased a great ability to win jump balls and stretch defenses thanks to his size. With Ricky Jones and Mitchell Paige graduating, Westbrook becomes an even bigger target in the passing game, and it should be an easy 70-receptions, 1,000-yard season in his final year in Bloomington.

No. 23 — Maurice Hurst, DT (Michigan)

2016 Season Stats: 33 tackles, 11.5 tackles for loss, 4.5 sacks, 7 QB hurries
Best Game: vs. Penn State (6 tackles, 3.0 tackles for loss, 1 sack)

Michigan losses so much on the defensive side of the football. Lucky for them, they have arguably the most disruptive interior defensive lineman in the Big Ten. Hurst was a menace in opposing backfields last season. It wasn’t just his ability to rush the passer from the middle of the line, but also his ability to smell out plays faster than anyone else that is so impressive.

This season, the cupboard around him is far from bare despite the massive losses from the starting group last year. With the likes of Rashan Gary around, Hurst is likely to still be a disruptive and productive force for the Wolverines. Don’t be surprised to also see his reputation help those around him on the D-Line, with a lot of attention paid to him to free up the rest to attack off the edge.

No. 22 — Rashard Fant , CB (Indiana)

2016 Season Stats: 33 tackles, 1.0 tackle for loss, 3 INT’s, 1 TD, 17 pass break ups
Best Game: vs. Penn State (3 tackles, 1 INT)

Opposing quarterbacks kept throwing at Rashard Fant in 2016, and most of them found out that wasn’t the smartest idea in the world. It was a breakout season, but the question is if he can do it again for his curtain call at the collegiate level.

Some believed he had the skill and the tape to take off for the NFL after last season, but Fant is back. His combination of size and speed is scary at cornerback, where small and fast rule the day. He’s more than capable of winning battles at the line of scrimmage, but he also wins battles mentally and with his eyes in the backfield more than most. Don’t be surprised to see Fant targeted less this season, but also be productive when targeted.

No. 21 — Godwin Igwebuike, S (Northwestern)

2016 Season Stats: 108 tackles, 6.0 tackles for loss, 2 INT, 7 pass break ups, 1 forced fumble, 1 fumble recovery
Best Game: vs. Nebraska (15 tackles, 2 tackles for loss, 1 forced fumble)

Few positions in the Big Ten return as much talent as the safety position. You would be hard-pressed to find a more versatile safety than Northwestern’s Godwin Igwebuike in my opinion. Last season he showed he was equally dangerous covering deep in the backfield and at the line of scrimmage.

Heading in to 2017, Igwebuike may be the best run-stopping defensive back in the Big Ten, while also being dangerous to throw on. Look for teams to have to gameplan around him, and that is the ultimate compliment of quality for a defensive back.

Andy Coppens is the Founder and Publisher of Talking10. He's a member of the Football Writers Association of America (FWAA) and has been covering college sports in some capacity since 2008. You can follow him on Twitter @AndyOnFootball

Football

Pair of Big Ten players named to PFF mid-season All-American team

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It hasn’t been a banner year for the Big Ten, with it seeming more and more like the days of the big two and little 10 (12 today). So, it shouldn’t come as a surprise that All-American honors are few and far between. 

But, it was near barren for the Big Ten when Pro Football Focus gave out its mid-season All-American honors. Just two players — both on offense — made the cut from the conference. 

Ohio State wide receiver K.J. Hill and Wisconsin right guard Beau Benzschawel were both named to the offensive All-American team. 

Wisconsin running back Jonathan Taylor was named honorable mention. So was OSU defensive tackle Dre’mont Jones on the other side of the ball. 

What makes Pro Football Focus’ lists so different are the fact that they are based on analyzing actual play from every player in college football throughout the season. 

It means, actual play on the field dictates getting on this list and not reputation or PR. 

Benzschawel is the second-highest rated guard in the country according to PFF, as they say this about his performance at the midway mark: 

Benzschawel is close behind [Terrone] Prescod, grading at 81.1 as a run-blocker, good for sixth among guards while allowing only three pressures on 151 snaps in pass protection.

Much like Benzschawel, Hill is also the second highest rated player at his position. Hill trails only Colorado’s superstar receiver Laviska Shenault Jr. and has a grade of 90.9 on the season. 

According to PFF, “Hill has been incredibly efficient as well, catching 85.1% of his targets while averaging 8.2 yards after the catch per reception.” 

It will be interesting to see how thing shake out in the second half of the season and if players like Chase Winovich, Rashan Gary or many other of the Badgers offensive lineman grade out better. 

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Good, Bad, Ugly: The tale of Buckeyes, Badgers and Illini in Week 3

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There is no two ways about it — Week 3 was the Big Ten’s collective worst nightmare. 

Just take a look at the final scores from the weekend:

So, on a Saturday in which contenders were dropping like flies, how do we make sense of what took place? 

Let’s take a look at the good, the bad and the ugly from Week 3 around the Big Ten. 

The Good

On a weekend that saw so much carnage from Big Ten teams, there is no doubt that Ohio State’s big win over TCU is the good of the weekend. It wasn’t just that the pickings were slim either, the Buckeyes put on a show in the win over the Horned Frogs at AT&T Stadium in Arlington, Texas. 

With the eyes of most of the college football world on them, OSU came up big. They punched hard first, going up 10-0 and then took a big punch from TCU for a pair of touchdowns, the last of which was a school-record 93-yard run by Darius Anderson for the 14-10 lead early in the second quarter. 

Let’s not forget there were two defensive touchdowns (albeit one shouldn’t have counted after further review that never happened on the field), including a “fat guy” TD by Dre’mont Jones. 

Lost in some of the craziness was the fact that Dwayne Haskins showed out in a big way. He was 24 of 38 for a crazy 344 yards and two touchdowns in the win. Haskins also had a rushing touchdown to cap off all the offensive scoring for his team. 

Sure, the defense gave up 511 yards, but it seemed more a byproduct of TCU’s offensive style than anything worrisome about the Buckeyes defense. After all, they forced three total turnovers, had three sacks and seven tackles for loss on the day. 

It was a shot across the bow of the rest of the elite in college football and arguable the most dangerous the Buckeyes have looked on both sides of the ball in awhile. 

The Bad

There’s no where to go here other than to head to Madison, Wis. where the Badgers came in to their contest against BYU with a 41-game home non-conference win streak. 

By the time the mid-afternoon matchup was over, the Badgers streak was also over and it wasn’t a fluke. The visiting Cougars took a page out of the Wisconsin playbook and simply out-muscled the Badgers on both sides of the ball. 

UW’s normally potent run game averaged just 4.7 yards per carry. Its defense allowed 191 yards to BYU on the ground. That pretty much sums up the shock that happened inside Camp Randall. 

For the first time in over 15 years, a non-conference opponent came in to Camp Randall, outplayed and finally beat the Badgers. We’ll see if this is a wake up call or the start of a snowball effect that can’t be stopped. 

Having rival Iowa on the road and at night should certainly get the Badgers attention this coming week. 

The Ugly

Sure, we could’ve gone with Northwestern getting blown out by a MAC opponent at home. There was also Rutgers’ piss-poor day at Kansas and Temple working over Maryland. But, those were all blowouts and there was just one loss that hurt more than any other…Illinois.

For just over 57 minutes, this week felt different for Illini fans…until South Florida’s Darnell Salomon hauled in a 50-yard touchdown from Blake Barnett with 2:24 to play.

That was just a downright brutal blow to a program that could’ve used the win in the worst way. Illinois got an early touchdown from running back Mike Epstein and then four field goals (three of which were over 40 yards) for a 19-7 lead late in the third quarter. 

Then the fourth quarter happened and you could just feel the game slipping away. Just over three minutes after the last of Illinois last field goal, it was Salomon who broke through with a 14-yard touchdown catch to make it a 5-point game. Add in a field goal midway through the quarter and a 19-7 lead was whittled down to 19-17. 

But, the Illini really only have themselves to blame. After all, they squandered four drives that were in USF territory and couldn’t get in the end zone. The Illini also couldn’t score a single point in the final quarter, and that’s usually not a good thing. 

The play in the final stanza was particularly brutal, as USF’s defense held the Illini to just 94 total yards and forced them to go 2-of-7 on third downs. That’s how you lose a game you should’ve taken care of. 

If there was a silver lining in the ugly way this loss happened, it was that MJ Rivers’ debut at quarterback was a success. He was 20 of 29 passing for 168 yards. While he didn’t get in to the end zone through the air, Rivers also didn’t turn the ball over while passing either. That’s a positive step lost in the brutal way this loss took place. 

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Buckeyes Football

J.T. Barrett finally gets elusive Big Ten title

J.T. Barrett finally got his Big Ten championship on the field, and he had a big hand it getting the title.

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For all the accolades and awards Ohio State quarterback J.T. Barrett has one, there are a pair of elusive things on his list. After Saturday night’s 27-21 win over the No. 4 Wisconsin Badgers, one of those things can be crossed off his list — Big Ten champion.

The last time the Buckeyes won the Big Ten title, Barrett was on the sideline on crutches following an injury the week before against Michigan. He played witness to Cardale Jones coming in and whopping up on the Badgers 59-0.

With the ball in his hand, Barrett wasn’t about to let this opportunity slip between his fingers.

Yeah, so I was saying to myself last time I got us to the party but I wasn’t let in,” Barrett said following the Big Ten title win. “So this time there’s opportunity for me to go play in this game, I was going to do whatever it takes to go out there and play with my brothers knowing that it’s my senior year.

“This was one of the reasons why I came back, to play in big-time games like this. With the opportunity to go do that — with the Lord, it was going to be right. With God, everything was going to be all right. That was in my head.

“So with that, just didn’t stress about, didn’t worry about it. Just did what I could as far as rehabbing my knee and reducing the swelling. And I knew, just put it in God’s hands and not worry about anything.”

Barrett had his hand in almost every score of the game, passing for a pair of touchdowns and rushing for a third en route to 21 of the Buckeyes’ 27 points.

He finished the game just 12 of 26 with two interceptions as a passer. But, he also had a pair of big touchdown passes including an 83-yard effort to Terry McLaughlin to get the Buckeyes on the board.

After throwing a pick-six, Barrett came back and tossed a wide receiver screen to Parris Campbell for a 57-yard touchdown.

But, Barrett’s biggest work came on the ground in short-yardage situations. He had 60 yards on 19 carries and put the Buckeyes up by 21-7 with 11:10 to play in the second quarter. His running turned in to big plays late as he was able to push piles and get just enough to keep critical drives alive.

Simply put, Barrett wasn’t going to be denied. Whether it was arthroscopic knee surgery six days ago or on the field against the nation’s No. 1 ranked defense.

The win wasn’t just his first Big Ten championship as a player on the field, it also gave Barrett the most career wins in a Buckeye uniform. OSU’s win in the Big Ten title game was his 37th career win as a starter, breaking the record set by Art Schlichter (1978-1981).

It’s all cause for celebration, at least for now. That’s because everyone’s attention will turn to Sunday morning and the College Football Playoff.

Can Barrett also check the second big thing off his list? You know, a national championship?

That won’t be up to him, but the win on Saturday night certainly will give the College Football Playoff committee something to think about.

There’s little question for the guy who has just one thing left to accomplish as Ohio State’s starting quarterback. Barrett isn’t afraid to do a little lobbying to make that College Football Playoff thing happen either.

“I think our resumé speaks for itself,” said Barrett. “I think — I mean we put ourselves in a good position of being the conference champions. Also the wins we had, the big-time wins and all the other stuff they consider.

“But I don’t know, I think we did what we were supposed to do. And that was today go beat the No. 4 team in the country in Wisconsin and be the Big Ten champs.”

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Big Ten

Ohio State Makes Its Case For A Playoff Appearance – Beats Wisconsin For The Big Ten Championship

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When news broke that J.T. Barrett underwent surgery on Monday after getting injured on the sideline last Saturday in The Game by a cameraman, the first thought was that there’s no way he’s going to play.

Think again.

Barrett somehow, someway got some miracle treatment from the Ohio State training staff and wobbled his way onto the field in Lucas Oil Stadium as the starting quarterback in 2017’s version of the Big Ten Championship Game. After just six days with his date with a surgeon.

His play was understandably as mixed as noodle casserole, but he made just enough plays to will Ohio State to victory over an undefeated and No. 4 ranked Wisconsin Badger team that was looking to hoist the trophy and punch its own ticket to its first ever playoff.

Early on it looked like no contest. Ohio State’s speed on the outside looked to be too much for a stout Wisconsin defense. Both Terry McLaurin and Parris Campbell did some work after the catch with two long touchdown passes of 84 yards and 77 yards.

And it wasn’t just in the passing game either. OSU freshman J.K. Dobbins gashed the top rated Wisconsin defense for 174 yards on just 17 carries (10.2 avg.). It was inevitably a game of big plays for Ohio State as it racked up 449 yards against a defense that normally averages giving up just over 230 per game.

A glaring wart for OSU though has continued to be mistakes. Once again, it almost cost the Buckeyes the game, and more than anything, kept the Badgers in the game. Barrett threw two interceptions — one for a pick six — and Mike Weber lost one on the turf. There were also some costly turnovers that either sustained Wisconsin drives, or hamstrung further scoring for the OSU offense.

It is a story to the season that could make Ohio State look foolish further down the road if it doesn’t find some way to improve the discipline in all areas.

Speaking of the Scarlet and Gray’s next hurdle, the waiting game now begins. Ohio State will undoubtedly be compared to Alabama for the fourth and final spot. It appears for all the world that Clemson, Georgia and Oklahoma are locks. USC will scream for inclusion, but it’s unlikely the Trojans will come from outside the Top Ten to have a real shot. That means it all comes down to ‘Bama and Ohio State — two mainstays in the early history of this whole playoff thing.

Ohio State can boast about two wins over top ten teams, and three against top fifteen with Michigan State thrown in there, but my, oh my those ugly losses against Oklahoma at home, and an unranked Iowa team on the road. Neither game was close. On another positive note, the Buckeyes do have a conference championship, something Alabama doesn’t have.

So what about the Tide? Yeah, it has looked dominant for most of the year, but the schedule has been lighter than a grocery bag full of feathers. It’s best win? Yep, it was against a top twenty team LSU. That’s it. There are no other Top 25 wins on the resume now that Fresno State went down, and there isn’t a conference championship to tote into the CFP committee’s room.  But, it does have just one loss, and has the mystique that goes along with being Alabama.

Let the arguing, teeth-gnashing and hand-wringing commence in earnest in Tuscaloosa and Columbus.

But let’s Ohio State enjoy this one for just a night. This is a talented team, and when it’s limiting mistakes and playing to its potential, it can hang with — and beat — anyone in the country.

It might just get yet another shot to show everyone.

 

 

Phil Harrison is a contributor to Talking10.com. He is also the Featured Big Ten Writer for CollegeFootballNews.com. Follow him

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